Also contemporary is the Guerilla Girls’ Do women have to be naked to get into the Met. Museum? (1989). What attracts your eye first? The yellow background. The black sans serif type sits strongly on that surface with a high level of legibility. The designers’ objective was to communicate a feminist social agenda specific to the representation of women and women artists in the art world. The poster’s aim is to expose issues of social injustice. As stated above, the color yellow is an attention grabber. The black type is strong. The color pink, while stereotypically feminine, is here neutralized when placed against the yellow. This image of the female was appropriated from the painting of a harem slave (reproduced below and painted by a man). And so, how do the visuals, colors, and text combine to convey the message? The image of the sexualized female, with its gorilla mask, has been turned into an image of defiance rather than subordination. The female designers have suggestively restaged the traditional male image. The pink is aggressive and jarring, not cute. The text at the top, which appears to be coming from the mouth of the gorilla mask, is strong and not submissive. Design elements can have great power. Properly manipulated they can construct narratives that are witty, sarcastic, serious, aggressive, or thought provoking. 

 

 IN THIS BOX INSERT NEW IMAGE TITLED “GORILLA GIRLS”  AND ALSO ADD IN “INGRES’ HAREM SLAVE” WHICH IS IN THE MODULE ON SOCIOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES.

 

 If graphic design convinces the viewer to think twice about a company, product, or individual, or social issue, then it has succeeded. If graphic design persuades the viewer to open up their wallet and buy into the product or lifestyle being portrayed, or join a cause, then it has changed their life. The objective of graphic design in capitalist societies is to fuel consumption, consumerism, and get people engaged in worldly concerns.