Other devices or strategies introduced by artists to engage viewers are the gaze and the like-look effect.

Gaze: the path the viewers’ eye travels across the surface of the work of art. The path is determined by the artist as evidenced in the various signs included into the work.

Like-Look Effect: eye contact, which engages the interest of the viewer. For example, you go alone to a bar, sit alone at the end of the room, and as you sip your drink, visually scan the crowd. You see someone attractive. All of a sudden, s/he looks up, you turn away ashamed that you have been “found out.” Eventually, you get the nerve to look up; your eyes meet, and the two of you live happily ever after. If s/he looked at you, s/he must like you. It is all in the body language.  

 

IN THIS BOX DUPLICATE THE IMAGE ON PAGE 19-3, INGRES’ HAREM SLAVE 

 

The harem slave in Ingres’ La Grande Odalisque makes eye contact with us; she sees us seeing her. Based on her body language, she doesn’t mind (but that is a function of her objectification as love slave). The viewer’s eye scans her body, especially along the long curve of her back. The target audience is obviously male heterosexual and due to the placement, proportion, and fragmentation of the body, coupled with the like-look effect, the interest level is heightened.