Organic Lines:

In contrast to vertical, horizontal, and diagonal lines (lines which can be drawn with a ruler), organic lines imitate the flow of nature. In the 18th century, art critics observed that “nature abhors a straight line,” or that there exist no straight lines in nature. Nature’s design is curved, flowing, and irregular in its contour. Therefore, organic lines are more free form as is appropriate to the representation of the world around us.

 

 

LIGHTEN UP THE ONE ABOVE, A LITTLE. THEN ADD TWO MORE TO THIS BOX –

THE FIRST GOES ABOVE THE FLOWER PAINTING, THE SECOND GOES BELOW THE FLOWER.

FROM THE NEW BATCH, THE  TOP IMAGE WILL BE “WESTON ARTICHOKE” .

THE BOTTOM IMAGE WILL BE  “ROCKING CHAIR”

 

Edward Weston’s photograph of an Artichoke Halved, 1930, clearly defines the lines naturally accruing within a naturally grown vegetable. Though this image can be interpreted as a document of a real object photographed at a specific moment in time, the organic lines revealed within are visually interesting.

 

Georgia O’Keeffe’s Black Hollyhock and Blue Lokspur, 1924, is composed of curved, flowing lines. Within this enlarged image of flowers, there are no verticals or horizontals. The lines are organic, not geometric. They twist and turn as they define the irregularity and roundness of the petals.

 

The third image is not of a “traditional” work of art, but of Thonet’s Reclining Rocking Chair with adjustable back, c.1880. While the object may be functional, the organic lines of the bent beechwood frame are visually interesting in an artistic sense. The lines of the armrests, legs, and underneath the footrest imitate the flow of vines. We may characterize these lines as expressive in that rather than defining functional edges and contours, they freely flow and lend the recliner, a lyrical and graceful character.