Devices for Representing Space

Objects at Baseline, Scale Adjustment: objects at the bottom are read as closer (conversely, objects up toward the horizon are further). Objects are seen as larger at the bottom of the picture and smaller toward the top of the picture. That is true to visual perception. As you ride down a multi-lane expressway, the highway actually seems elevated (higher) up toward the horizon. Also, cars traveling near you are visually larger than cars 200 yards ahead. The photograph below was taken of a pedestrian walkway at the Temple of Heaven in Beijing, China. While the walkway is of a consistent width from where the photographer is standing all the way to the building beyond, the walkway does seem to get narrower in the distance, almost as if coming to a point. People far away do appear smaller than people closer to the baseline, or bottom of the picture.

 

FIRST, AT TOP PLEASE INSERT NEW IMAGE TITLED “ CHINESE PERSPECTIVE”

LIGHTEN UP THE ABOVE IMAGE JUST A LITTLE, BUT IS THERE ALSO A WAY TO GET IT INTO BETTER FOCUS? AS I WAS MOVING THE IMAGE AROUND THE BOX TO GET IN THESE INSTRUCTIONS, THE PICTURE GREW IN SIZE

 

 

In Wang Hui’s The Southern Tour of the Emperor, 1693, the people at the baseline seem to be closest to us.

 They overlap the wall of the palace compound. Within the palace, walls overlap other walls seemingly behind them. Up toward the horizon, people are smaller as they travel out of the village.