Examples:

Edward Hopper’s Early Sunday Morning, 1930, is a perfectly composed painting. If you were to draw an imaginary line down the center of the painting, you would have an equal balance and visual weight of the building with its distribution of windows and doors. For every window on the left, there is a corresponding window on the right. For unity, the first and second floors are of equal height. However for variety, the first floor of the building is green; the second floor is red. Additionally, the windows are all rectangular and identical in height. The same is true for the first floor with the shapes and sizes of doors and plate glass windows. In order to maintain the viewer’s level of interest, Hopper needed to introduce variety. While both the fire hydrant and the barber pole are verticals and equidistant from the imaginary centerline, there is variety in their coloration and height. Variety is also apparent in the first floor. If we follow the distribution of doors and windows, we see an  A (window)  B (door) A B A B AA B A rhythm from left to right.

 

THIS NEEDS TO BE BRIGHTENED UP QUITE A BIT, IT IS ALSO A LITTLE TILTED DOWN TO THE LEFT

 On the second floor, there is variety in the placement of the drawn shades, the high value and warm colors of the curtains and shades, the low value of the closed shutters, and variety in the subtle spacing.

Also note the artist’s use of complimentary colors: green/red for first floor to second and orange/blue for the awnings on the first floor. Variety can also be seen in the dark rectangle in the upper right corner, which may suggest another building. For rhythm, there is a succession of horizontal lines from the baseline up to the roof: from the shadows on the sidewalk to the base of the building to the lower frame of the plate glass windows to the top of the windows to the level of the second floor to the window frames and finally the roof. These constitute the “beat” or rhythm of horizontals. A similar rhythm exists from left to right, though again with variety - akin to musical syncopation